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Pollen

More than Bee Food


pic Honeybees collect pollen (which contains proteins) which they mix with nectar (or honey) to feed their young. When they collect more pollen than they need, they store it away in cells, similar to the way they store excess nectar as honey.

In East Tennessee there is seldom a shortage of pollen. For this reason beekeepers can harvest a small portion of what the bees collect without causing any problem for the colony. To harvest this pollen the incoming forager bees are routed through a screen. While passing through the screen some of the pollen is dislodged from the bees and is collected in a drawer. The beekeeper then removes the pollen from the draw.

This harvested pollen can be used for any number of things. It can be used as a nutritional supplement for people, as an ingredient in soap or other products, or it can be saved and given back to the bees should there for some reason be a shortage of pollen.

Pollen - One of Nature's Most Perfect Foods



General Information

Bee Pollen contains at least 22 amino acids, 18 vitamins, 25 minerals, 59 trace elements, 11 enzymes or co-enzymes, 14 fatty acids, 11 carbohydrates and approximately 25% protein. Bee pollen is extremely rich in carotenes, which are metabolic precursors of vitamin A. It is also high in B complex and vitamins C, D, E and Lecithin. Bee pollen contains over 50% more protein than beef, yet its fat content is very low. It is also an excellent vegetarian source of protein typically possessing more of the essential amino acids, pound for pound, than animal proteins like meat, eggs, and dairy products.

Daily use of pollen also ensures an intake of the more obscure, yet essential trace minerals that may be lacking from commercially grown produce and are often not included in vitamin and mineral supplements. Most of us are unaware that the nutrients supplied by cooked fruits, vegetables and meats are not considered fresh because their enzymes have been exposed to high heat. Even taking a multivitamin can't offer the superior nutrient array of raw and fresh food.

A nutrient is a molecule you must have, but the body cannot manufacture. You have to ingest (eat) it. If you don't have it, at first you will not feel well. If you don't get it for a longer time, you will begin to feel sick. If you don't get it for too long a time you are probably going to die.

Each ounce of honey bee pollen contains just 28 calories. Only 7 grams are carbohydrates, plus 15% lecithin, the substance that burns away fat and 25% is pure protein.

What's in it for you?

NATURAL WEIGHT CONTROL
One ounce of honey bee pollen 10-15 minues before eating stabilizes faulty metabolism, often causing unhealthy weight gain or loss. Rich in lecithin, pollen causes a speedy increase in calorie burning. Antiputrefactive effects benefits digestion.

COMPLETE NUTRITION
Pollen gives you all essential enzymes, nutrients, all vitamins, all minerals, and trace elements needed for good health and vitality.

SKIN RESTORATIVE POWER
Exhaustive studies abroad show honey bee pollen can improve healthy and / or aging skin when taken internally. Eliminates acne and clears unattractive age spots, plumps wrinkles. The clear skin of youth and health comes from within.

INCREASES RED BLOOD CELLS
Studies show that honey bee pollen increases vital oxygen-carrying red blood cells up to 25%. You feel better when your circulation is better.

THE POWER OF STEROIDS
Honey bee pollen-power outpowers harmful steroids without chemical side-effects. "Honey bee pollen is the greatest body-builder on earth, contributing not one ounce to obesity or excess fat and should be the cornerstone for every weight-loss diet," says F. Huber, German naturalist.

Twenty-eight nutrients are found in the human body. Fourteen are vital, essential elements present in such small amounts that they are called - "micro-nutrients." Honey bee pollen contains all 28 nutrients:
CalciumAlpha-Aminobutyric Acid Brassins
HexodecanolHypoxalthine
PhosphorusMonoglycerides
IronGibberellins
CopperCrocetin
PotassiumDiglycerides
MagnesiumKinins
ManganeseZeaxanthin
SilicaTriglycerides
SulphurVernine
Sodium - Titanium-ZincLycopene
Iodine - ChlorinePeutosaus
Boron - MolydbenumXanthine
NucleosidesAuxins
Guanine
Vitamins:
Provitamin A (carotenoids) 5-9 mg
Vitamin B1 (thiamine) 9.2 micrograms
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin)
Vitamin B3 (Niacin)
Vitamin B5 (panothenic acid)
Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) 5 micrograms
Vitamin B12 (cyamoco balamin)
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)
Vitamin D
Vitamin E
Vitamin H (biotin)
Vitamin K. Choline. Inositol
Folic Acid, 5 micrograms
Pantothenic acid 20-50 micrograms / gram
Rutin. 16 milligrams
Vitamin PP (nicotinicamide)

HOW TO TAKE BEE POLLEN
Adults:
Start with 1/4 tsp. in the morning (1/2 hour before breakfast) followed with some water, juice or milk. Increase your intake every day by a few grains until reaching 1 tsp. a day, for normal daily use. You make take up to 1 tbsp. daily.

Children:
Start from 3 grains, increasing by 2 grains every few days until reaching 1/2 tsp. a day. You may mix pollen with raw honey and eat it, or dilute it in a liquid at room temperature. DO NOT feed honey or pollen to children under 18 months of age.

Special notes:
If you are severely allergic to bee stings, follow the amount indicated for children or contact your physician for his / her opinion.

* This information is general in nature and is not considered medically authoritative. Please contact your physician with any questions or concerns.
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